Category:Screw Conveying

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Archimedes of Syracuse

The screw conveyor is a direct descendant of the Archimedes screw. However, while the Archimedes screw lifts fluids trapped within cavities formed by its inclined blades, the screw conveyor propels dry bulk materials (powders, pellets, flakes, crystals, granules, grains, etc.) through the pushing action of its rotating blades. Also, most screw conveyers in use today have a single blade, while modern Archimedes screws typically have two or three blades.

Archimedes of Syracuse (c. 287 BC – c. 212 BC) was a Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer. Although few details of his life are known, he is regarded as one of the leading scientists in classical antiquity. Among his advances in physics are the foundations of hydrostatics, statics and an explanation of the principle of the lever. He is credited with designing innovative machines, including siege engines and the screw pump that bears his name.

A screw conveyor is a mechanism that uses a rotating helical screw blade, called a "flighting", usually within a tube. They are used in many bulk handling industries. Screw conveyors in modern industry are often used horizontally or at a slight incline as an efficient way to move semi-solid materials.